HPI 30th Anniversary Announcements

30th ANNIVERSARY RECEPTION AND WORKSHOP EXTRAVAGANZA!

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Example of Hiroya 355U Green

One of our visiting papermaker friends hailing from Fukui Prefecture in Japan this summer is Hiroya Yamashita who is responsible for our much-adored Hiroya series of papers. Due to price, these spectacular papers have  transitioned  into a special-order only product. Hiroyas can be ordered in batches of 100 sheets per color except for the 3 colors we currently still have available in-store. When it comes to choosing a color, the Pantone swatch book is your oyster; you can choose any color found in the Pantone swatch book. Hiroya papers are first made by hand and then a rectangle of color that covers most of the sheet of paper is screen printed onto its surface. The ink used is colorfast and will not fade, leaving a lasting impressive swath of color.

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Hashimoto’s Acrylic, paper, bamboo, wood and Dacron
48 × 83 × 8 1/4 in; 121.9 × 210.8 × 21 cm  (picture: Artsy)

One fan of the Hiroya paper includes international artist, Jacob Hashimoto. Hiroya paper’s colorfastness and strength are both desirable for Jacob’s projects as they can withstand both time and physical tension required for the kite structures built by Hashimoto.

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Pinwheels in a Japanese garden

Similar to kites, pinwheels catch wind to create motion and in a sort of poetic encounter, Hiroya Yamashita and fellow Echizen Washi papermakers will lead a pinwheel making workshop during our 30th anniversary reception and workshop extravaganza. This is the THIRD of the four free workshops we will have on July 28. Pinwheels were invented in the 1800s and modernized in the early part of the 20th Century, by Armenian Immigrant and toymaker Tegran M. Samour. The toys quickly made their way overseas and are now a staple of childhood fun in most countries. Don’t forget to save the date July 28, 2018 for our 30th Anniversary Reception and Workshop Extravaganza! Workshops are free and open to everyone, in addition to making pinwheels, visitors can also marble paper, and make chigiri-e pictures also led by visiting papermakers. In June we’ll reveal the last of our 4 workshops.

 

Hiromi Paper, Inc. 30th Anniversary: Chigiri-e

Our 30th Anniversary Reception and Workshop Extravaganza is fast approaching! The second of our FOUR workshop stations that we’ll reveal today is Chigiri-e. The Japanese art form of Chigiri-e is now well over 1,000 years old dating back to the Heian Period. Chigiri-e neared death in the 1800s but the creation of Tengujo/Tengucho provided a new way of approaching the method. In Japanese chigiru roughly translates to “tear” and e translates to “image”, “picture”, or “painting” thus Chigiri-e can be roughly translated as “torn picture”. More accurately though, Chigiri-e is, an image made of thin pieces of Japanese paper torn and shredded and then affixed to a stiffer surface, such as board or thick paper stock, and adhered with PVA, Funori, Fueki-kun nori, or Jin Shofu.

chigiri-eThin layers of Washi (Japanese paper) allow the artist to build depth, perspective, and value in the image. Skilled Chigiri-e artists can achieve a sophistication reminiscent of watercolor paintings, however, it can be an art form suitable for all ages–from children to older communities. All of the different kinds of Washi (Japanese papers) possess many characteristics that lend themselves well to different techniques.

IMG_1722Tengujo/Tengucho, Color Kozo, and Color Gampi, for instance, can be used to layer on color and value due to it’s highly translucent nature. It can be used to quickly and subtly cover large swaths of space with color or texture.

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Amate Swirl

 

The fibers of Kinwashi, Unryu, and Amate Swirl can be easily dissected from their surfaces to create gestures that resemble branches, stems, flower stamen, hair, etc.

While there are traditional shikishi boards used to house the Chigiri-e, any sort of paper will suffice as the base, depending on the needs and desires of the artist. Papers like our Black, White, and Natural Shikishi, Bhutan Stationery, Amate Solid, and Yucatan make excellent bases, though the latter 3 diverge a bit from tradition.

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Now available in store only is the Cavepaper Scrap Pack ($9.00) which comes filled with ends and bits of Cavepaper’s experiments and left overs, often one-of-a-kind pieces. These are helpful in adding unusual textures and patterns to your Chigiri-e.

RECAP: SGCI 2018 Altered Landscapes

2018’s Southern Graphics Council International Conference was held at Bally’s Hotel in the always effervescent Las Vegas. This year, HPI Staff Edwin and Yuki packed up a car with washi, spatulas, Fueki-Kun Nori, and papers from around the world, and put the pedal to the metal. Just a 4-hour drive from Culver City (adjacent to L.A.), Vegas was quite a delightful adventure.

The most popular item on the Las Vegas strip, during the conference, was our Feuki-kun Nori— small containers of corn starch paste that are non-toxic and good for everyday crafting. We are the first distributors of Fueki-kun in the United States. These little heads were all the buzz!

As always, attendees of the conference enjoyed free shipping on orders surpassing $20 if they were placed during the conference days.

This year Hiromi Paper, Inc. donated papers for several demos held during the conference.

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Tinkertown, a collaborative art piece created by contributions from attendees received samples of our Navy Blue Color Kozo and HP-58 Sekishu Natural.

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Tamarind Institute was spotted giving a Chine Collé demo with our HP-58 Sekishu Natural. Everyone looked on as Brandon demoed different ways to tear a silhouette of underwear. Sekishu is naturally strong and thin, perfect for Chine Collé.

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At the opposite corner, Rialuca Iancu used our Asuka 150 gsm to demo her Pop-up folded structures. The Asuka 150 is the perfect weight to create 3-dimensional structures that will not collapse when more weight is added within the pop-up cards.

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We also became friends with Hurley’s printing studio who used HM-60 Hosho Natural to print limited edition woodblocks by Sean from the Woodcut Funhouse in Lousiana.

We look forward to next year’s SGCI in Dallas, Texas. 

 

Laura Viñas revisited

 

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Lejania by Laura Viñas. Watercolor on Tengucho paper.

We’re looking back at work by Laura Viñas this month. Through her work Viñas explores the psychological reality about self-contextualization and memory. Painting Tengucho 5g and 9g papers with watercolors, Viñas transforms the seemingly delicate sheets into powerful haunting images of landscapes alluding to the Pampa region of South America– a vast expanse of low-lying flat fields that unfurl in every direction that you look towards the horizon. Viñas work asks us to look into the image on the surface of the Tengucho paper and once there to try to look past it and get lost in the illusory expanse, and to consider the space behind the paper as part of what’s directly confronting us in each painting or installation.

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In the words of the artist:

My subject matter deals with  the perception of  landscape in order to create new places.
These new places are a mental construction, and in them the object of my work is embedded: time deposits, memory and distance.
At the same time, it allows me to research into the concealed and enigmatic side of these objects.
I choose my materials with precision: thin rice papers, watercolors and photography.Furthermore, I restrict the color palette, the vanishing points, and materials in order to fully develop my creativity and concentration.
I manipulate nature and light  as an abstraction, to generate a mirror where the viewer finds himself.  –Laura Viñas’ artist statement

Take a look at more of Laura’s work here: 

Hiroko Karuno: Moro Jifu Exhibition

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May 27th – May 30th 2016

10AM – 4:30PM @ Naoya Shiga Former Residence

Address: 1237-2 Takabatakecho, Nara, Nara Prefecture 630-8301

Tel: +81 742-26-6490 Website: http://www.naragakuen.jp/sgnoy/ Continue reading “Hiroko Karuno: Moro Jifu Exhibition”

Jon Shimizu: Book project using Asuka inkjet papers

Art student Jon Shimizu shared with us his experience printing on the inkjet Asuka papers for his book project, and how much he loved working with them. Below is Jon’s artist statement. Thank you, Jon!

(We always appreciate any feedback about the papers, so please let us know!)

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Continue reading “Jon Shimizu: Book project using Asuka inkjet papers”

Artist Feature: Sal Taylor Kidd on Mohachi Paper

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Salted paper printing on Mohachi

ORIGINS – Sal Taylor Kidd

On view until May 14th

Gallery 169

169 W Channel Rd, Santa Monica, CA 90402

Originally from the UK, photographer and artist Sal Taylor Kydd has lived all over the world, before settling in Los Angeles. Formerly an editor, Sal has been developing her photography for the last six years, both as an editorial and a fine art photographer. Sal will be showing her work from her series “Just When I Thought I Had You” at Gallery 169 in Santa Monica. Check out her amazing prints done on our Mohachi paper.

“Origins” artist statement:                                                                 

Growing up in a small town in England, I had a childhood that was in many ways typical of its time. In the 1970s children led relatively unfettered lives and were free to explore the world with a large degree of independence. In my work photographing my children and family, I find myself revisiting my childhood through their experience, playing by rivers and ponds in the summer, idling the days away, discovering a real connection with nature. Every year we spend our summers on a small island off the coast of Maine. It has become a touchstone for us as a family, a place for us to connect with nature and with each other. For my children these are times of growth and exploration that are strongly tied to a sense of place, of roots and authenticity.

This series is entitled “Origins” because through these images I am attempting to understand what defines that sense of connection and understanding of where we come from, what ties us to a place and tethers us to what has come before?                                                                       

The processes I have used in this series is Salted Paper printing, in which I use a combination of antiquarian and contemporary technologies. I use a digital camera to capture my images, but then I create a physical negative from the digital file, which is then printed in a contact frame, using the same techniques pioneered by British photographer Henry Fox Talbot in the 1800s.                                                                      12806115_10153955822389948_2613101145682938713_n

With these processes, the element of time is not inconsequential, it takes time to make a print, a process that gives opportunity for discovery and serendipity. You coat your paper, you expose it to the sun, you wait. It is a contemplative and mindful undertaking. In each of the steps, from sizing the paper, to exposing the negative and developing the print, there is a tangible connection with nature and the natural elements brought into the print, which again mirrors the content of my work. The artistry of “making” a photograph becomes itself an act of becoming and invention.